Friday bumper quiz

escher_day_night

1 Dante Gabriele Rossetti, John Millais and William Holman Hunt are all members of which movement?

2 Which two US presidents has Anthony Hopkins played in film?

3 Whose opera was Cavalleria Rusticana?

4 In which Asian city would you find the Potala Palace?

5 In which country did Che Guevara die?

6 The eruption of Mt Vesuvius that buried Pompeii also buried another town. Which one?

7 We know dromedary – what’s the other one?

8 How many neutrons are there in a Hydrogen atom?

9 If you hold the temperature of an ideal gas constant, what happens to its volume if you double the pressure?

10 You’ll have noticed many ladies wearing purple of late. According to Elle, which colour is trending for Spring 2014?

Answers will be Saturday evening.

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13 responses to “Friday bumper quiz

  1. Answers –

    Saturday evening.

  2. 5,6,7,8 known by me. Think 9 might be stays the same. Incidentally, my bully has scuppered two jobs I was offered and lied to the DHSS about the reason why I was dismissed, thus jeopardising my benefit payment. I used to think “thou shalt not suffer a witch to live” was a bit harsh. It isn’t.

  3. Power goes to their heads.

  4. He played Nixon in one, I think.
    Angola? (Wild guess.)
    Herculaneum.
    Zero, but the H isotopes have one and two (deuterium and tritium, from memory, I think).

  5. grr… formatting.
    2,5,6,8.

  6. These quizzes are quite interesting, but extremely difficult if one does not hit Wikipedia and/or other Internet sources. This raises the question of what doing them means, according to the constraints one places on oneself.

    So, for example, avoiding the Internet: is it fair to use any other sources immediately available. Is it permissible to use all the books (especially encyclopedias and dictionaries) in my house? Is that fair to more modern households (who have, for example, swapped their bookcases for hangings of fine art)?

    Is it fair to phone a friend? Is it fair to phone 10 friends? Are friends allowed to come back later, perhaps having looked on the Internet?

    As a new variant, I am (for this post at least) in to the possible meanings of the question as posed. So this is ‘challenging’ the quizmaster on his/her precision in asking the question.

    On question 8, I read (sadly I did not know it off the top of my head – but I’m sure there are still at least 3 books in the house that would have answered) that the average number of neutrons in an Earthly hydrogen atom is around 0.00015576. Is this the correct answer to the question, or is the quizmaster looking for the simpler zero?

    On question 9, I thought of pumping up tyres – a commonly known experience for the common man (and even uncommon woman). We pump away and, if the tyre’s need were considerable, the pressure could be made double or something similar. There is no halving of the volume; in fact there is almost certainly a slight increase – and not all of this disappears as the tyre cools to the temperature of the surrounding air. I know my PV=RT (even the adiabatic variant), and still remember most that ‘flows’ from it. But for the common man or woman, I argue that doubling the pressure means pumping more into the same volume: a condition less favoured by our quizmaster than the ideal.

    For the others, I really am struggling, and doubt all my books to hand would help with much short of 20 minutes per question (a tad too much, even for you James). But I’m pretty sure the answer to 5 begins with ‘B’, a country that has never been particularly renowned for its system of justice – but (with a little help from the north, I hear) on this occasion delivered it in its most practical form.

    Returning to my theme of the day, isn’t the Internet wonderful!

    But, in all seriousness, how has it changed the meaning of education? [Or perhaps – How it has changed the meaning of education!]

    Best regards

  7. All those years of playing truant as a schoolkid. I blame my youth for being a dummy. 🙂 I could only get five off the top of my head.

  8. Thanks all. Nigel raises a fair question as I didn’t lay down parameters and criteria.

    It’s an extension of what I ran at university. I’d divide a group of, say 12, into four, give them one [usually open-ended] question each for the session and say go to it. They could get answers from wherever they wanted, even from other groups. Nothing was considered cheating. In all that time, no one asked me the answers.

    In our case here, I’d say you get the answers from wherever, as you will anyway. The constraints you place on yourself are those you place on yourself. In some quizzes though I say “no cheating now” and that one would be good to try to guess.

    I have these for the Friday quiz – you might beg to disagree:

    1. Pre-Raphaelites
    2. Nixon and JQA
    3. Pietro Mascagni
    4. Tibet
    5. Bolivia
    6. Herculaneum
    7. Bactrian
    8. None
    9. Don’t know – hoping you’d tell me
      http://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/kt/otherlaws.html ?
    10. Orange – was discussing this with girls today

    On the neutrons, I did have zero but the decimal place answer was interesting. I’d hope the answer giver would explain. My attitude is that anything which increases knowledge in this way is a good thing and having to strategize and/or search is also a good thing.

    I’ll need to state these things up front in the next quiz. Purpose is never to put someone down. The net is great for this as no one need answer but can lurk and read.

    Question for quizmaster – how would you measure success in this quiz?

    Answer – to increase knowledge of various subjects.

    Question for quizmaster – how would you measure this?

    Answer – if stats say 100 visit the page and just a few comment, many of those 100 might not have thought they knew but now they do. Knowledge has increased.

  9. The gas answer is that double the pressure gives half the volume at the same temperature. You ideally would specify constant mass.

    The decimal places answer to the hydrogen question relates to the relative occurance in nature of the isotopes of hydrogen, H1, H2 (aka deuterium) and H3 (aka tritium).

  10. “Orange – was discussing with girls today…”

    I really hope not ‘cos orange with orange hair = yuk! Pastel peachy colour maybe but I ain’t walking around looking like a belisha beacon for anyone!

    😉

  11. Actually, sweetness and light, she did happen to be a fiery redhead the first one I asked. She said she’d consider it. No taste?